Sunday, 3 March 2013

Mini Review: On The Origin of Species - Charles Darwin



Title - On The Origin of Species
Author - Charles Darwin
Blurb

In the Origin of Species (1859) Darwin challenged many of the most deeply held beliefs of the Western world. Arguing for a material, not divine, origin of species, he showed that new species are achieved by 'natural selection'. Development, diversification, decay, extinction and absence of plan are all inherent to his theories. Darwin read prodigiously across many fields; he reflected on his experiences as a traveller, he experimented. His profoundly influential concept of 'natural selection' condenses materials from past and present, from the Galapagos Islands to rural Staffordshire, from English back gardens to colonial encounters. The Origin communicates the enthusiasm of original thinking in an open, descriptive style, and Darwin's emphasis on the value of diversity speaks more strongly now than ever.

Review

There have been a few works of non fiction that have been on my TBR pile for years and this year I finally read Charles Darwin's brilliant work. As I read the book I was constantly reminded of how amazing the mind of Mr Darwin really was. As a science enthusiast and hopefully a future scientist I had been brought up on the works of Darwin therefore the ideas he presented not only seemed practical however I am always startled to a stop when I was reminded that Darwin had come up with his deductions with no knowledge of the basic human building blocks, genetics. Despite this Darwin was startlingly close to the hidden secrets of genetic inheritance, I only wish that Darwin and Gregor Mendel had had met and maybe just maybe the future might have looked just that little bit different.

I am going to give this book 5 out of 5 starts and a recommendation for all science enthusiasts and anyone who wants to understand the thought process behind one of the most ground breaking and divisive scientific theories.
Product Detail
Paperback: 432 pages
Publisher: OUP Oxford
Language: English

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